New York

Mexican prostitutes are are sent to Queens where they can service dozens of clients a day
SEXEGENARIAN 270 Reviews 991 reads
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THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXCERPT (WITH NAMES DELETED IN ACCORDANCE WITH TER RULES) OF AN ARTICLE THAT APPEARED IN THE N.Y. DAILY NEWS ON SUNDAY, 6/3/12 ON PAGES 16 & 17-FYI
Small Mexican town of Tenancingo is major source of sex trafficking pipeline to New York
Families of pimps send young victims to Queens where they are often forced into 'delivery girl' prostitution
By Erica Pearson / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Published: Sunday, June 3, 2012, 2:20 AM
Corey Sipkin/New York Daily News

Luxurious homes said to belong to sex trafficking families dot the landscape of Tenancingo, a small town about 80 miles from Mexico City.
TENANCINGO, TLAXCALA — In this small Mexican town that sends sex slaves to New York, little boys dream of growing up to be pimps.
Gaudy gabled houses that rise above gated walls are proof of the profits to be made from funneling “delivery girls” to Roosevelt Ave. in Queens.
The town of 10,000, about 80 miles from Mexico City, is Mexico’s undisputed cradle of sex trafficking, one end of a pipeline that leads directly to our city’s streets.Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s New York field office arrested 32 sex traffickers last year; 26 of them were from Tenancingo.
Each family sends its youngest and most handsome men across Mexico to pose as salesmen with nice clothes and fancy cars.
They woo rural women waiting at bus stops or taking Sunday strolls in the park. Once the women are seduced, they are coerced into prostitution.
The women are held inside the Tenancingo “security houses” — where some say they were repeatedly raped. If they have children, the kids are kept in the town for leverage after they are dispatched to red-light districts.
Some go to Mexico City. Many end up in Queens, where johns can order them for delivery by calling numbers advertised on cards, key chains or bottle openers, authorities say.
One 24-year-old survivor said she spent two months in Tenancingo after her “boyfriend” took her there to meet his family.He turned out to be a pimp and she wound up in New York. After escaping from her Queens apartment in 2009, she helped ICE catch the family ringleader — but her nightmare is not over.
Officials said each prostitute they bring to New York — where they service up to 35 johns a day — nets the traffickers about $100,000 a year. The money is wired back to Tenancingo, where the pastel  fortresses grow ever larger.  
In Tenancingo, Tlaxcala, a little town of 10,000 that has become world famous as the center of the country's international sex trafficking trade, families of pimps are known for their large, gaudy homes.
In March, a 25 year old man pleaded guilty in Brooklyn Federal Court to luring a woman named  to the U.S. and forcing her into prostitution. Six other  family members have been charged in New York.
One of Tenancingo’s most notorious families  was busted by ICE after a tip to the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.
Two brothers got 50 years in prison in 2004 after admitting they forced at least eight women, once wooed with chocolates and teddy bears, into prostitution in Queens.
A 4-foot-10 matriarch woman, was dubbed “mini-madam” after she was extradited to New York. Court sketches from her 2008 plea show her with her white hair pulled up in pigtails.
While Tlaxcala and other states have passed laws making human trafficking a crime, punishment in Mexico is rare. Before last year, victims’ families didn’t even have any official way to report trafficking in Tlaxcala Since then, there have been 120 complaints and 24 arrests — but not a single conviction.
A stricter federal anti-trafficking bill has been passed but not signed into law. A  Mexican congresswoman said she hopes the tougher standards will deter trafficking. But she knows history is not on her side.A Tenancingo legend holds that pimping goes back to the arrival of  a conquistador  in 1519. A warrior was is said to have offered  virgins to the conquering Spaniards.“They got blankets in exchange,” the Congrwswoman said.


-- Modified on 6/5/2012 12:15:22 AM

I think it's just so sad. Whenever I hear about trafficking stories, besides the obvious empathy for the girls, I find myself wondering more and more about the clients.

When a client sees these women, I wonder if he realizes what the situation is and is so far gone he doesn't care, or if he's just so concerned with his immediate needs being met that he simply doesn't bother to think about it.

I'm so thankful to be in this community by choice. I'm so thankful that there are hobbyists who care and respect and appreciate the service given. Thanks guys!

Kiss me,

Kate

AJohnAndAGentleman389 reads

Women who are forced into being providers - whether they're brought to the U.S. from another country, or born in the US - are protected by federal anti-trafficking laws and, increasingly, by state laws (including in NY).  The law considers them victims, and considers their traffickers/pimps criminals.

BUT - many women in this situation don't realize they have legal protection, because their traffickers go to great lengths to keep them isolated from sources of information and from means of communication.

Unfortunately, it's not always easy to tell when a provider is in the business by choice or by coercion.  Some coerced providers learn to be very good actors because they know it's bad for their business if clients think they are sex slaves...and they know that when business is bad, their traffickers/pimps take it out on them.

One thing that clients as well as true providers can do is to tell providers they meet something like: "If you ever meet a provider who is in the business because someone is forcing her to do it, there is a confidential hot line they can call to get help." Then hand a slip of paper with the name of the service, the phone number and the website URL (see below).  I've done this after the session, even with women who seem like they are truly independent.  There's no downside, but the upside is that somewhere down the road, the information you passed to the provider makes its way to someone who needs it.

Below - in English and in Spanish - is information from the anti-trafficking hotline service, called the National Human Trafficking Resource Center:

"The National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) is a national, toll-free hotline, available to answer calls from anywhere in the country, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year.

"The NHTRC is a program of Polaris Project (www.polarisproject.org), a non-profit, non-governmental organization working exclusively on the issue of human trafficking.

"We are not a government entity, law enforcement or an immigration authority.

"Call us at: 1-888-3737-888
To report a tip;
To connect with anti-trafficking services in your area; or,
To request training and technical assistance, general information or specific anti-trafficking resources.

"Llama la línea gratuita y confidencial: 1-888-3737-888
Denunciar casos de trata;
Conectarse con servicios en su localidad;
Pedir información o recursos en español sobre la trata de personas y la esclavitud moderna."

-- Modified on 6/6/2012 1:07:38 AM

Posted By: AJohnAndAGentleman
One thing that clients as well as true providers can do is to tell providers they meet something like: "If you ever meet a provider who is in the business because someone is forcing her to do it, there is a confidential hot line they can call to get help." Then hand a slip of paper with the name of the service, the phone number and the website URL (see below).  I've done this after the session, even with women who seem like they are truly independent.  There's no downside, but the upside is that somewhere down the road, the information you passed to the provider makes its way to someone who needs it.

Below - in English and in Spanish - is information from the anti-trafficking hotline service, called the National Human Trafficking Resource Center:

"The National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) is a national, toll-free hotline, available to answer calls from anywhere in the country, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year.

"The NHTRC is a program of Polaris Project (www.polarisproject.org), a non-profit, non-governmental organization working exclusively on the issue of human trafficking.

"We are not a government entity, law enforcement or an immigration authority.

"Call us at: 1-888-3737-888
To report a tip;
To connect with anti-trafficking services in your area; or,
To request training and technical assistance, general information or specific anti-trafficking resources.

Many of us hobbyists (at least me) only conduct our business with ladies we know are independent, and are  participants in the game by their own choice and volition.  Last thing we want to do is meet with ladies that don't want to be here.

Hate to say this, but, the activity described in the article, probably organized or aided by the Mexican drug and criminal syndicates, needs to be shut down.

AJohnAndAGentleman540 reads

Most of us know providers we are *sure* are independent and in the business by choice.  But it's really hard to know for sure.  Trafficking is insidious - and it's NOT relegated to BP and Asian or Mexican brothels.  Though you rarely hear or read about it (because it tends to be much harder for law enforcement to build a case), there are American-born providers with great websites, donations in the $$$ to $$$$ range, and hosting at 4 star hotels who are in the business by coercion, but whose day-to-day well-being depends on making sure clients believe they are independent and in the business by choice.

AJohnAndAGentleman362 reads

I don't mean to suggest that trafficking is as common at the higher-end of the business as it is in the BP/Asian or Mexican brothel end of the business, just that it does exist and it can be hard to spot.  Plus, providers talk with each other.  So for both of those reasons, it doesn't hurt to spread the word about the hotline resource I mentioned.

-- Modified on 6/7/2012 10:27:25 PM

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