Tijuana

Re: Any TJ girls/agencies come to SD?
Burt2010 8 Reviews 5196 reads
posted

I've discussed laws governing prostitution with three different Mexican attorneys.  One held a position equivalent to a U.S. District Attorney. This is what they say:

State and local laws--not Mexican federal law-- governs prostitution.  So the law varies according to the jurisdiction.

In Tijuana, prostitution per se is legal.  However, public manifestation of prostitution--meaning things like solicitation on a street corner--are illegal (but permitted in a Zone of Tolerance such as the Zona Norte.)  Living off the earnings of a prostitute--by doing things like operating a brothel--are illegal.

Working without a health card is a violation of the administrative code, not the criminal code.  A man cannot get into legal trouble if his prostitute lacks a valid health card.  It's sort of like buying a taco from an unlicensed street cart.  The vendor is breaking the law, but not the customer.  (You need a license to sell tacos, but not to buy them.  Same deal with prostitution.)  



rb16017 reads

From what I've seen posted before, most won't come here and take the chance of being arrested.  Where in TJ, it's not as much of a "legal" issue.

Kadjevic6127 reads

It most certainly is a legal issue, I do beg to differ.  Women get locked up for prostitution on a regular basis here, especially when they don't have their health cards updated, which in the case of escorts, most of them don't.  The higher end ones will, but it's still illegal in Mexico.

I've discussed laws governing prostitution with three different Mexican attorneys.  One held a position equivalent to a U.S. District Attorney. This is what they say:

State and local laws--not Mexican federal law-- governs prostitution.  So the law varies according to the jurisdiction.

In Tijuana, prostitution per se is legal.  However, public manifestation of prostitution--meaning things like solicitation on a street corner--are illegal (but permitted in a Zone of Tolerance such as the Zona Norte.)  Living off the earnings of a prostitute--by doing things like operating a brothel--are illegal.

Working without a health card is a violation of the administrative code, not the criminal code.  A man cannot get into legal trouble if his prostitute lacks a valid health card.  It's sort of like buying a taco from an unlicensed street cart.  The vendor is breaking the law, but not the customer.  (You need a license to sell tacos, but not to buy them.  Same deal with prostitution.)  



Kadjevic5216 reads

Incorrect.  Criminal law governs solicitation and practice of prostitution.  Prostitution is illegal in the state of Baja California, I can assure you.  Comparing solicitation to buying a taco is another one of your complete absurdities.

Consult with attorneys all you want.  If there's one thing that Tijuana has a lot of, it's lawyers.  They are everywhere.  I unfortunately have to spend quite a great deal of my time at both of the courts in the city, so I think I've got a good grip on what's legal and what's not.  The lawyer who told you that prostitution is legal on the municipal and state level is probably banking on you getting into trouble so he can collect in legal fees to get you out of it.

I have a better idea -- why not go down to the ministerio publico and ask them if it's legal.  They are the ones who would put you in prison for it afterall, and no juez calificador is going to set you free once you admit to it and claim it to be legal.  You'll be behind the glass at the tribunales within a few days.  I doubt you'd have to go to the court in Mexicali, but you'd definitely be at the one in La Mesa.

Prostitution is tolerated in certain areas of the city with certain code enforced, but it is not legal in any sense of the word and you can be arrested, I assure you.

But hey, original poster, try it out.  Go to some place in the business district and solicit someone in front of a policeman.  When you get nabbed, maybe Burt will bail you out with his lawyer's "it's legal" defense.

Oh, and FYI, in Mexico, administrative code is the criminal code.  It's synonymous.  Not sure if your lawyer friend told you that.

Yes, a few have visas and will cross. But the selection is very limited.

However, either the chica or agency must know you well for it to happen. Expect to pay a surcharge.

If this is something that really interest you then contact the major agencies like MLB and CINTJ.  But wait until your're an established, repeat customer.



-- Modified on 1/2/2010 1:10:16 AM

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