The Erotic Highway

Good for you, madiba51 - keep reading, it's a great book! EOMregular_smile
TheLoveGoddess 1698 reads
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That discuss the psychological implications of long term hobbying on men in terms of their world outlook, psychological problems and evaluation of their emtional makeup.

Something with case studies as well as demographic information is what I have in mind.

I'm in the process of doing some self evaluation and want something to use as a guideline.

I don't suppose that there is too much on this except from the perspective as hobbying as detrimental, and I'm not too interested in that point of view but if as a by product of this there is something useful I'd even slog through that kind of material.

LG:  I suspect your upcoming article would have something for me.  When will it be availiable to purchase?

If anyone knows of useful material I would be much obliged.

TheLoveGoddess2057 reads

Dear mrfisher,

Unfortunately there isn't much of what you are seeking. Psychological implications of long term hobbying are invariably painted with a soiled brush. However, look for anything you can get by Teela Sanders, a professor at University of Leeds. She has written extensively about hobbyists, but more from a sociological perspective than psychology. Also, read books by my buddy Ron Weitzer, professor of sociology and criminology at GWU in DC. Again, not much psychology, but at least cogent arguments FOR sex work in general, not against it.

My paper will not yield much either in that regard - it's a quantitative study with not much "psychology" in it. I am submitting it to another journal now - it may be a while, even if they accept it.

Read Teela, she's great,
The Love Goddess

madiba512491 reads

that there are "as many myths to dispel about male customers as there are about female sex workers".

madiba511789 reads

This paper was presented by Natalie Hammond, a researcher at the University of Sheffield, at the Sex Work Postgraduate Conference held at the University of Leeds on Jan 22, 2009.
Teela Sanders presided over the conference.  Unfortunately, no PDF of the paper on the Internet, but I'm sure you could contact the author to request a copy.

I don't know whether the author addresses issues such as unconscious bias, the psychological impacts on researchers, or other potential topics, but it might be worth a quick read for a researcher like yourself.  

-- Modified on 11/18/2010 4:23:04 PM

TheLoveGoddess2536 reads

I am familiar with this presentation. For a while in 2008-9, there was an uproar in the anti-prostitution community where female researchers became "emotionally impacted" by holding interviews with clients in East London and also Scotland for studies on mixed prostitution venues (outdoor primarily, some indoor, nothing like TER situations). Studies included statements by researchers who reported becoming "ill" from listening to "monstrous clients." This is Hughes and Farley territory - the worst, quite frankly. I am not saying that Hammond belongs with this group - clearly not - but I don't find these issues germane to studying male clients. After all, these things are about the researchers themselves and not really about the clients.

Last time I checked, we called it bias,
The Love Goddess

madiba512132 reads

Agreed, Melissa Farley and Donna Hughes exhibit the worst sort of bias.

I'm not familiar with Hammond's work, but on the face of it, I agree that there is no reason to lump her together with them.  But I think that the subject she is writing about is worth taking a look at.  Certainly, if these kinds of issues arise when doing this kind of research, it does, as you say, have much more to do with the researchers than with the male subjects, but that seems to be her point too.

In any case, it is only relevant to the extent that it affects the quality of the research.

I see no evidence of any bias of any sort in your research.  

 

Posted By: TheLoveGoddess
I am familiar with this presentation. For a while in 2008-9, there was an uproar in the anti-prostitution community where female researchers became "emotionally impacted" by holding interviews with clients in East London and also Scotland for studies on mixed prostitution venues (outdoor primarily, some indoor, nothing like TER situations). Studies included statements by researchers who reported becoming "ill" from listening to "monstrous clients." This is Hughes and Farley territory - the worst, quite frankly. I am not saying that Hammond belongs with this group - clearly not - but I don't find these issues germane to studying male clients. After all, these things are about the researchers themselves and not really about the clients.

Last time I checked, we called it bias,
The Love Goddess

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